Barnsley

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Barnsley
Barnsley Town Hall (1).jpg
Barnsley Town Hall
Barnsley is located in South Yorkshire
Barnsley
Barnsley
Barnsley shown within South Yorkshire
Population91,297 (2011)[1]
OS grid referenceSE3406
• London175 mi (281 km) SSE
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townBARNSLEY
Postcode districtS70-S75
Dialling code01226
PoliceSouth Yorkshire
FireSouth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
EU ParliamentYorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
53°33′13″N 1°28′45″W / 53.5537°N 1.4791°W / 53.5537; -1.4791Coordinates: 53°33′13″N 1°28′45″W / 53.5537°N 1.4791°W / 53.5537; -1.4791

Barnsley (/ˈbɑːrnzli/) is a town in South Yorkshire, England, located halfway between Leeds and Sheffield. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town centre lies on the west bank of the Dearne Valley. Barnsley is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, of which Barnsley is the largest and its administrative centre. At the 2011 Census, Barnsley had a population of 91,297.[1]

Barnsley is a former industrial town centred on linen in its former years and coal mining and glassmaking.[2] The industries declined in the 20th century. Barnsley's culture is rooted in its industrial heritage and it has a tradition of brass bands, originally created as social clubs by its mining communities. It is also home of the Barnsley chop.

The town is accessed from junctions 36, 37 and 38 of the M1 motorway and has a railway station on the Hallam and Penistone Lines. Barnsley F.C. is the local football club, which has competed in the second tier of British football for most of its history. Barnsley F.C. also won the FA Cup in 1912.

History[edit]

Cheapside, circa 1904

The first reference to Barnsley occurs in 1086 in the Domesday Book, in which it is called Berneslai and has a population of around 200.[citation needed] The origin of the name Barnsley is subject to debate, but Barnsley Council claims that its origins lie in the Saxon word "Berne", for barn or storehouse, and "Lay", for field.[citation needed]

The town was in the parish of Silkstone and developed little until in the 1150s when it was given to the Pontefract Priory. The monks built a town where three roads met: the Sheffield to Wakefield, Rotherham to Huddersfield and Cheshire to Doncaster routes. The Domesday village became known as Old Barnsley, and a town grew up on the new site.[3]

The monks erected a chapel of ease dedicated to Saint Mary, which survived until 1820[citation needed], and established a market. In 1249, a Royal charter